Dentista Bologna  Logo
Servizio Privato di Riabilitazione Orale e Cranio Cervico Mandibolare Via G. Ruggi, 7/D - Bologna
Via G. Garibaldi, 37 - Minerbio (BO)
Untitled
  • Home
  • Chi siamo
  •  Bologna
  •  Minerbio
  • Servizi
  • Contatti
  • News

 

The Science behind Lithium Disilicate; A Metal-Free Alternative

 

 

Carenza di ferro? Ci vuole l'odontoiatra!

 

 

Svelato il legame fra diabete e infiammazione delle gengive

 

 

L'efficacia di un nuovo spazzolino da denti progettato per l'igiene dei denti sensibili

 

 

Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Hypertension

 

 

Odontoiatria LOW COST: in Austria chiudono 400 studi convenzionati con la catena MC Zahn

  

 

Le apnee diurne possono predire la mortalità. 

 

The Science Behind Lithium Disilicate: A Metal-Free Alternative

 

Written by George W. Tysowsky, DDS, MPH Sunday, 01 March 2009 00:00

Dentists and laboratory technicians today require materials that offer outstanding aesthetics, high strength, and efficient productivity. Historically, dentistry also has always been faced with the challenge of finding ways to combine 2 incompatible materials in a synergistic way, whether that combination is metal with metal-ceramic or zirconia with zirconia layering ceramic. Simultaneously, dental practices and dental laboratories are increasingly seeking ways to realize the wonderful op-portunities presented by CAD/CAM and digital fabrication techniques that offer the benefits of consistency in the production of a restoration and expanded material options. To satisfy these requirements, lithium disilicate glass ceramic represents a unique material choice available to both doctors and laboratories. What’s more, lithium disilicate has the present and future potential to provide new options for improving patient care.
For the dentist, lithium disilicate is a highly aesthetic, high-strength material that can be conventionally cemented or adhesively bonded.1 In terms of dealing with dissimilar material combinations, lithium disilicate offers a unique solution with its ability to offer a full contour restoration fabricated from one high-strength ceramic, thereby eliminating the challenge of managing 2 dissimilar materials. Lithium disilicate is a material that can be used in all areas of the mouth, when specific considerations are taken into account. For laboratory ceramists, the versatility and performance of lithium disilicate enables them to optimize their productivity when fabricating restorations using this material, since either lost-wax pressing or CAD/CAM milling fabrication techniques can be used.

 

Figure 1. IPS e.max Press (Ivoclar Vivadent) lithium disilicate.

Figure 2. IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) lithium disilicate.



Figure 3. Posterior lithium disilicate 
crowns. Teeth Nos. 18, 19, and 20.

 

WHAT IS LITHIUM DISILICATE?

 

Glass ceramics are categorized according to their major crystalline structure and/or application.2 Lithium disilicate is among the best known and most widely used types of glass ceramics. IPS e.max (Ivoclar Vivadent) lithium disilicate, for example, is composed of quartz, lithium dioxide, phosphor oxide, alumina, potassium oxide, and other components (Figure 1). Overall, this composition yields a highly thermal shock resistant glass ceramic due to the low thermal expansion that results when it is processed. This type of resistant glass ceramic can be processed using either well-known lost-wax hot pressing techniques or state-of-the-art CAD/CAM milling procedures.

The pressable lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press [Ivoclar Vivadent])) is produced according to a unique bulk casting production process in order to create the ingots. This involves a continuous manufacturing process based on glass technology (melting, cooling, simultaneous nucleation of 2 different crystals, and growth of crystals) that is constantly optimized in order to prevent the formation of defects (eg, pores, pigments). The microstructure of the pressable lithium disilicate material consists of approximately 70% needle-like lithium disilicate crystals that are embedded in a glassy matrix. These crystals measure approximately 3 to 6 µm in length.
Polyvalent ions that are dissolved in the glass are utilized to provide the desired color to the lithium disilicate material. These color-controlling ions are homogeneously distributed in the single-phase material, thereby eliminating color-pigment imperfections in the microstructure.
Machineable lithium disilicate blocks are manufactured according to a similar process, but only an “intermediate” crystallization is achieved in order to ensure that the blocks can be milled efficiently in a crystalline intermediate phase (blue, translucent state). The intermediate crystallization process leads to the formation of lithium metasilicate crystals, which are responsible for the material’s processing properties, machineability, and good edge stability. It is after the milling procedure and the restorations are fired that they reach their final crystallized state and their high strength. The microstructure of intermediate crystallized IPS e.max CAD lithium disilicate consists of 40% platelet-shaped lithium metasilicate crystals embedded in a glassy phase (Figure 2). These crystals range in length from 0.2 to 1.0 µm. Postcrystallization microstructure of IPS e.max CAD lithium disilicate material consists of 70% fine-grain lithium disilicate crystals embedded in a glassy matrix.
Similar to the pressable lithium disilicate, the millable IPS e.max CAD blocks are colored using coloring ions. However, the coloring elements are in a different oxidation state during the intermediate phase than in the fully crystallized state. As a result, the lithium disilicate exhibits a blue color. The material achieves its desired tooth color and opacity when the lithium metasilicate is transformed into lithium disilicate during the postmilling firing process.

 

Table 1. Properties of IPS e.max Press.

 

CTE (100-400°C [10-6/K]

10.2

CTE (100-500°C) [10-6/K]

10.5

Flexible strength (biaxial) [MPa]

400

Fracture toughness [MPa m0.5]

2.75

Modulus of elasticity [GPa]

95

Vickers hardness [MPa]

5,800

Chemical resistance [µg/cm2

40

Press temperature EP 600 [°C]

915 to 920

Table 2. Properties of IPS e.max CAD.

 

CTE (100-400°C [10-6/K]

10.2

CTE (100-500°C) [10-6/K]

10.5

Flexible strength (biaxial) [MPa]

360

Fracture toughness [MPa m0.5

2.25

Modulus of elasticity [GPa]

95

Vickers hardness [MPa]

5,800

Chemical solubility [µg/cm2

40

Crystallization temperature [°C]

840 to 850

PHYSICAL AND CLINICAL PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM DISILICATE

In vitro testing has included mechanical testing of strength using static load with a universal testing machine, subcritical eccentric loading using a chewing simulator (Willytec), and a long-time cyclic loading with a chewing simulator (eGo). The results of these tests demonstrate that:

  • Regardless of the in vitro test performed, in comparison to various restorative dental material for crowns (eg, leucite glass ceramic, metal ceramic, zirconia), the lithium disilicate material demonstrates superior results.

  • To ensure maximum success using the lithium disilicate material, it is important to consider the minimum thickness of the lithium disilicate.

  • The strength of the ceramic material is about 80 to 100 MPa for metal ceramics, approximately 100 MPa for veneered zirconia, and 150 to 160 MPa for leucite glass ceramic. However, for the pressed lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press LT and HT), the strength is in the range of 360 MPa to 400 MPa (Table 1).

The pressable lithium disilicate material is indicated for inlays, onlays, thin veneers, veneers, partial crowns, anterior and posterior crowns, 3-unit anterior bridges, 3-unit premolar bridges, telescope primary crowns, and implant restorations.3-5 In some cases, minimal tooth preparation is desired (eg, thin veneers), and lithium disilicate (IPS e.max [Ivoclar Vivadent]) enables laboratories to press restorations as thin as 0.3 mm while still ensuring a strength of 400 MPa. If sufficient space is available (eg, retrusion of a tooth), no preparation is required.

 

 

Figure 4. Implant retained lithium disilicate restoration.

 

 

Indications for the machinable lithium disilicate material are inlays, onlays, veneers, partial crowns, anterior and posterior crowns, telescope primary crowns, and implant restorations (Figures 3 and 4). For a posterior crown fabricated to full contour using CAD methods, lithium disilicate offers 360 MPa of strength through the entire restoration. As a result, restorations demonstrate a “monolithic” strength unlike any other metal or metal-free restoration.
Overall, these materials demonstrate specific advantages to dentists and patients, including higher edge strength versus traditional glass ceramic materials (ie, can be finished thinner) low viscosity of heated ingot enables pressing to very thin dimension (ie, enabling minimal prep or no prep veneers); and chameleon effect due to higher translucency (Table 2).

Conclusion

Lithium disilicate is emerging as a restorative material of choice for single unit indirect restorations. Lithium disilicate increasingly is being integrated into the North American and Western European dental practices. Not only is lithium disilicate strong, but it is very versatile and lifelike. It comes in many translucencies and can be layered to maximize aesthetics in select cases. The disilicate materials (IPS e.max Press and IPS e.max CAD) maximize these benefits for laboratories and dentists. 
We have witnessed the many benefits of lithium disilicate and believe that it is now one of the best restorative materials available today for single unit indirect restorations. Lithium disilicate material (IPS e.max Press and IPS e.max CAD [Ivoclar Vivadent]) has been in clinical trials for the last 4 years with adhesive and self-adhesive/conventional cementation, and the results have been very positive. We continue to complete both in vivo and in vitro testing to enhance the material’s performance and maximize its use 
clinically.

References

    1. Fabianelli A, Goracci C, Bertelli E, et al. A clinical trial of Empress II porcelain inlays luted to vital teeth with a dual-curing adhesive system and a self-curing resin cement. J Adhes Dent. 2006;8:427-431.
       

    2. Deany IL. Recent advances in ceramics for dentistry. Crit Rev Oral Biol Med. 1996;7:134-143.
       

    3. Sorensen JA, Cruz M, Mito WT, et al. A clinical investigation on three-unit fixed partial dentures fabricated with a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. Pract Periodontics Aesthet Dent. 1999;11:95-106.
       

    4. Höland W, Schweiger M, Frank M, et al. A comparison of the microstructure and properties of the IPS Empress 2 and the IPS Empress glass-ceramics. J Biomed Mater Res. 2000;53:297-303.
       

    5. Kheradmandan S, Koutayas SO, Bernhard M, et al. Fracture strength of four different types of anterior 3-unit bridges after thermo-mechanical fatigue in the dual-axis chewing simulator. J Oral Rehabil. 2001;28:361-369.

[da http://www.dentistrytoday.com]

Torna ad inizio pagina

 

Carenza di ferro? Ci vuole l'odontoiatra!

 

Esiste un’anemia che si combatte sottoponendosi al trattamento parodontale. Suona “strano”? Eppure è vero, anche se con un distinguo: quella che l’odontoiatra può curare è la cosiddetta anemia da malattie croniche quando legata alla presenza di malattia parodontale. Un gruppo di ricercatori indiani ha infatti recentemente dimostrato non solo che chi soffre di malattia parodontale ha un rischio superiore di sviluppare anemia, ma anche che questa carenza può essere curata su una poltrona odontoiatrica esattamente con gli stessi strumenti utili per il parodonto: il trattamento parodontale non chirurgico.

L’anemia da malattie croniche è una condizione che si può verificare in presenza di infezioni e infiammazioni croniche, tumori, malattie autoimmuni ed epatopatie, e che altera i valori ematologici nonostante la presenza nell’organismo di scorte di ferro e vitamine” descrive Avani Rangaraju Pradeep, docente presso il Dipartimento di parodontologia del Government Dental College and Research Institute di Bangalore, in India. “Per capire innanzitutto se questo tipo di anemia sia legata anche all’infiammazione cronica del parodonto, abbiamo prelevato campioni di sangue da 187 pazienti affetti da malattia parodontale cronica rilevando che ben il 33,6% di essi, e precisamente 37 uomini e 26 donne, presentavano concentrazioni di emoglobina inferiori alla norma. Poiché nessuno di essi soffriva per altre patologie a cui lo stato anemico potesse essere ascritto, è possibile concludere che l’infiammazione cronica del parodonto può comportare lo sviluppo di anemia; inoltre, poiché i valori del volume corpuscolare medio erano nella norma, possiamo confermare che non vi era carenza di ferro né di vitamine e che dunque la condizione può essere classificata come anemia da malattie croniche”.

Lo studio, in via di pubblicazione sul Journal of Periodontology, riporta inoltre una seconda parte della sperimentazione volta a capire se il trattamento parodontale possa curare, oltre ai tessuti orali, anche lo stato anemico. “Abbiamo poi sottoposto a trattamento parodontale non chirurgico 60 pazienti anemici a cui successivamente abbiamo prelevato campioni di sangue, dopo 3 e dopo 6 mesi” prosegue Pradeep; “i risultati dicono che, a 6 mesi dal trattamento, tutti i pazienti presentavano un miglioramento nei valori della concentrazione di emoglobina, del numero di eritrociti e del tasso di sedimentazione eritrocitaria, e quindi un miglioramento globale rispetto allo stato anemico iniziale; è utile all’odontoiatra sapere inoltre che il miglioramento più marcato è ottenuto dalle pazienti donne”.

Si pensa che l’anemia legata alla malattia parodontale cronica, spiegano gli autori nelle pagine dello studio, sia causata dal fatto che l’infiammazione del parodonto porti a una sovraregolazione delle citochine proinfiammatorie. “I processi infiammatori, così come la presenza di cellule tumorali o di una reazione autoimmune, attivano il sistema immunitario e la produzione di citochine, in particolare il fattore di necrosi tumorale alfa, l’interleuchina-1 e l’interleuchina-6; sono proprio queste citochine proinfiammatorie a deprimere la produzione di eritropoietina e portare allo sviluppo di uno stato anemico” conclude Pradeep. “Come altre infiammazioni croniche, dunque, anche la malattia parodontale comporta un reale rischio di anemia che può, però, essere ridotto attraverso le cure odontoiatriche: abbiamo provato infatti che il trattamento parodontale non chirurgico comporta un miglioramento dello stato anemico più visibile a 6 mesi che a 3 mesi, e che quindi progredisce nel tempo”.

[fonte dall'articolo di Debora Bellinzani su odontoconsult. 
Bibliografia: “Anemia of chronic disease and chronic periodontitis: does periodontal therapy have effect on anemic status” J Periodontol 2010 Sep 15. ]

 

Torna ad inizio pagina

 

Svelato il legame fra diabete e infiammazione delle gengive

Uno studio condotto da ricercatori dell'Universita' di Edimburgo ha trovato un collegamento tra il diabete e l'infiammazione cronica delle gengive, la parodontite. Curarla, affermano i ricercatori, aiuta a ridurre i livelli di zucchero nel sangue. 
Lo studio, pubblicato sul network di informazione medico-scientifica Cochrane Collaboration, ha permesso di stabilire il nesso minimo, ma significativo. La causa scatenante di tutto ciò potrebbero essere gli stessi batteri che provocano l'arretramento delle gengive, la cui azione influenzerebbe anche l'efficacia dell'insulina nel controllo degli zuccheri. 
Per approfondimenti

[Fonte - Simpson TC, Needleman I, Wild SH, Moles DR, Mills EJ, Treatment of periodontal disease for glycaemic control in people with diabetes su Cochrane Reviews]

 

L'efficacia di un nuovo spazzolino da denti progettato per l'igiene dei denti sensibili

 

Una curvatura particolare, setole più alte di altre, e strutture molto morbide: anche se l’aspetto non è poi così differente dal normale, esiste uno spazzolino con queste caratteristiche specificamente disegnato per l’igiene dei denti sensibili. Ed è, soprattutto, uno strumento che funziona: uno studio pubblicato recentemente dalla rivista Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry ne ha testato l’efficacia, scoprendo che l’uso di uno spazzolino specifico può veramente ridurre la sensibilità dentinale.
“Abbiamo analizzato le prestazioni di questo particolare spazzolino, in commercio negli Stati Uniti, su 41 persone con almeno due denti che presentavano sensibilità alla stimolazione tattile e termica, e che non fossero affette da alcuna patologia del cavo orale” afferma Thomas Schiff, docente e direttore del Dipartimento di radiologia maxillofacciale presso lo Scottsdale Center for Dentistry di San Francisco, negli Stati Uniti. “Abbiamo poi fornito a queste persone un dentifricio non specifico per denti sensibili e proibito qualsiasi altra pratica di igiene orale che non fosse la pulizia con lo spazzolino due volte al giorno, in modo da “isolare” l’effetto di quest’ultimo da qualsiasi altro eventuale fattore. E il risultato è stato molto incoraggiante: già a quattro settimane dall’inizio della sperimentazione la sensibilità dentinale provocata sia dal contatto sia da stimoli termici, misurata oggettivamente con gli strumenti di laboratorio, risultava diminuita, e a otto settimane lo era in misura ancora maggiore, a testimonianza di risultati che migliorano nel tempo.”
Ma come fa uno spazzolino a migliorare lo stato di chi soffre di sensibilità dentinale? 
“La differenza è nel design dello strumento: le setole interne, più corte, formano tre circonferenze pensate per accogliere le corone dentali mentre quelle esterne, più lunghe e disposte lungo il perimetro della testa dello spazzolino, sono disegnate per pulire delicatamente lo spazio tra dente e dente. Tutte le setole, in ogni caso, sono sottili e molto morbide per non stimolare eccessivamente le superfici dentali ed evitare di consumare lo smalto; la disposizione delle setole e la curvatura dello spazzolino, inoltre, sono pensate per portare la minore quantità di acqua possibile a contatto con denti e gengive limitando così la stimolazione dei tessuti orali” descrive Schiff. “Poiché altri studi hanno già dimostrato che, nonostante la morbidezza e la conformazione specifica, lo spazzolino assicura anche un’efficace igiene orale, possiamo infine affermare che esso può essere considerato un presidio utile per circa il 30 per cento della popolazione, ossia le persone che, secondo le stime attuali, soffrono in qualche misura di sensibilità dentinale.”

“The efficacy of a newly designed toothbrush to decrease tooth sensitivity”
Compend Contin Educ Dent 2009;30(4):234-40.

 

Torna ad inizio pagina

 

Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Hypertension

 

In most cases, hypertension likely results from a complex interplay of various factors.

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) — in particular, obstructive sleep apnea — is associated with hypertension. To determine whether this association is mediated by obesity, researchers examined data from a multicenter prospective cohort study of SDB and cardiovascular disease; baseline data from this study were published previously (JW Cardiol Jun 2 2000).

Nearly 2500 people (mean age, 60) without histories of hypertension or treatment for SDB underwent overnight polysomnography (with calculation of the apnea-hypopnea index) at baseline. During 5 years of follow-up, about 25% of participants developed hypertension. In a multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, and race, a significant "dose–response" relation was noted between baseline apnea-hypopnea index and development of hypertension.

But when the analysis also was adjusted for body-mass index, the statistically significant relation disappeared. Even the association between the most severe degree of SDB (apnea-hypopnea index ?30) and incident hypertension did not quite reach significance (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.93–2.47) after adjustment for BMI.

Comment: This study suggests that much of the association between SDB and hypertension is mediated by obesity. In one previously published longitudinal study in which researchers examined this topic, adjustment for obesity attenuated — but did not eliminate — this association (JW Gen Med Jun 2 2000). However, the previous study involved much younger subjects (mean age, 47) and differed from the current one in several other respects.

The bottom line: Although SDB occasionally might be the primary cause of hypertension, in most cases, hypertension likely results from a complex interplay of various factors.

 Allan S. Brett, MD

Published in Journal Watch General Medicine July 7, 2009

Citation(s):

O’Connor GT et al. Prospective study of sleep-disordered breathing and

hypertension: The Sleep Heart Health Study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2009 Jun 15; 179:1159.

* Original article (Subscription may be required)

* Medline abstract (Free)


Torna ad inizio pagina


ODONTOIATRIA LOW COST: IN AUSTRIA CHIUDONO 400 STUDI CONVENZIONATI DELLA CATENA MC ZAHN


La catena dentale low cost Mc Zahn ha dovuto dichiarare fallimento. L'attività dei 6 studi dovrebbe comunque continuare. L'unione delle casse dentali aveva già dovuto in precedenza stabilire colloqui con Mc Zahn, poiché esistevano un paio di "prestazioni" iniziate ma non completate.

Mc Zahn non sarebbe del tutto innocente. Il pubblico ministero del Wuppertal così afferma a proposito del sospetto contro Mc Zahn di truffa e falsificazione di certificati.: "Mc Zahn è stata accusata di aver sottoposto certificati falsi provenienti dalla Cina alle casse mutue. Il danno si aggirerebbe intorno agli 860.000 Euro".

Mc Zahn voleva in origine costruire 450 filiali in Germania, nelle quali l'elemento di protesi doveva essere fornito a tariffa zero. La protesi avrebbe dovuto essere prodotta in Cina. A causa del costo di produzione conveniente, la tariffa per il paziente avrebbe dovuto essere gratuita (grazie al rimborso cure statale).L'obiettivo non è stato raggiunto. Cosa possiamo imparare da tutto ciò? Il risparmio a tutti i costi non è sempre desiderabile.

 

Torna ad inizio pagina

 

LE APNEE DIURNE POSSONO PREDIRE LA MORTALITA’

Rappresentano uno dei maggiori fattori di rischio di mortalità per cause cardiologiche

 

Un tasso di mortalità pari al 41% in pazienti sofferenti di scompenso cardiaco e che presentano apnee diurne, contro il 26% nei pazienti con respirazione normale. E’ questo il risultato di uno studio prospettico su larga scala, pubblicato sul European Journal of Heart Failure, svolto da un team di clinici e ricercatori dell’IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri -Istituto Scientifico di Montescano, volto a stabilire quanto gli episodi diurni di apnee, che si verificano a riposo in posizione supina, possano influire sulla prognosi dei pazienti con scompenso cardiaco. Un monitoraggio breve (10 minuti) diurno della respirazione potrebbe, dunque, rappresentare un metodo utile ed economicamente sostenibile per selezionare i pazienti che necessitano indagini più complesse e non sempre disponibili come l’esame polisonnografico. Lo studio, cui hanno collaborato anche il Dipartimento di Cardiologia del Policlinico di Monza e la Cardiovascular Medicine del John Radcliffe Hospital dell’Università di Oxford, dimostra come tali alterazioni respiratorie diurne rappresentino uno dei fattori di rischio di mortalità per cause cardiologiche, indipendentemente da altre variabili cliniche e funzionali. Questa osservazione potrebbe avere importanti implicazioni pratiche per i trial clinici che esplorano nuovi trattamenti per lo scompenso cardiaco. Il campione selezionato era di 380 pazienti con scompenso cardiaco di varia eziologia, sui quali è stata eseguita una registrazione diurna del respiro della durata di 10 minuti, in posizione supina. I casi in cui si è osservata una alterazione respiratoria diurna sono stati 145 (38% sul totale dei soggetti studiati). Questi pazienti, prevalentemente maschi, presentavano una cardiopatia più grave (classe NYHA più alta), battito cardiaco più veloce, funzione ventricolare sinistra e parametri ematochimici più fortemente compromessi e un aumento significativo delle aritmie ventricolari. Un periodo di follow-up medio di 41 mesi ha messo in evidenza una relazione tra la presenza di tali alterazioni e la mortalità per cause cardiache. Le alterazioni respiratorie di tipo apneico o ipoapneico sono state quindi predittive di morte, con un rischio doppio rispetto ad un respiro normale, indipendentemente dai più importanti fattori di rischio in questi pazienti, quali la Classe NYHA (New York Heart Association - classificazione che identifica lo stato clinico e la prognosi dei pazienti con insufficienza cardiaca), la frazione di eiezione (indicatore clinico della funzione sistolica ventricolare sinistra), le dimensioni del cuore, la pressione arteriosa sistolica, il trattamento con farmaci beta-bloccanti, il picco di VO2 (consumo di ossigeno durante sforzo) e la funzione renale. Mentre la modalità tradizionale di registrazione di più parametri fisiologici durante la notte (polisonnografia) è costosa, tecnicamente impegnativa e di conseguenza non può essere utilizzata come screening dell’ampia popolazione di pazienti con scompenso cardiaco, ottenere informazioni dalla registrazione diurna del respiro attraverso un esame di 10 minuti potrebbe essere molto più facilmente praticabile e consentirebbe di essere introdotta in studi multicentrici per la terapia dello scompenso cardiaco. [da sanitanews.com]

 

Torna ad inizio pagina


  Ultimo aggiornamento: 08 dicembre 2012